Rules of the Game: Detention, Deportation, Disappearance

£11.99

Out of stock

Following the 2005 bombing of London’s transportation infrastructure, Tony Blair declared that “the rules of the game have changed.” Few anticipated the extent to which global counterterrorism would circumvent cherished laws, but profiling, incommunicado detention, rendition, and torture have become the accepted protocols of national security. In this book, Asim Qureshi travels to East Africa, Sudan, Pakistan, Bosnia, and the United States to record the testimonies of victims caught in counterterrorism’s new game. Qureshi’s exhaustive efforts reveal the larger phenomenon that has changed the way governments view justice. He focuses on the profiling of Muslims by security services and concurrent mass arrests, detaining individuals without filing charges, domestic detention policies in North America, and the effect of Guantánamo on global perceptions of law and imprisonment.

Out of stock

Category:

Description

Following the 2005 bombing of London’s transportation infrastructure, Tony Blair declared that “the rules of the game have changed.” Few anticipated the extent to which global counterterrorism would circumvent cherished laws, but profiling, incommunicado detention, rendition, and torture have become the accepted protocols of national security.

In this book, Asim Qureshi travels to East Africa, Sudan, Pakistan, Bosnia, and the United States to record the testimonies of victims caught in counterterrorism’s new game. Qureshi’s exhaustive efforts reveal the larger phenomenon that has changed the way governments view justice. He focuses on the profiling of Muslims by security services and concurrent mass arrests, detaining individuals without filing charges, domestic detention policies in North America, and the effect of Guantánamo on global perceptions of law and imprisonment.

 

Author: Asim Qureshi

Format: Paperback

Length: 236 pages

Release: 2009

(NOTE: CAGE represents cases of individuals based on the remit of our work. Supporting a case does not mean we agree with the views or actions of the individual. Content published on CAGE may not reflect the official position of our organisation.)